SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

By: Sean Kayden

Written and Directed by:

David O. Russell

Based on the novel by:

Matthew Quick

Rated R for language and some sexual content/nudity

Release Date: November 21st, 2012 (limited)

Review by: Sean Kayden

When the first trailer debuted for Silver Linings Playbook, I had my reservations about it. It seemed too nice, too safe, especially for writer/director David O. Russell (The Fighter, I Heart Huckabees, Three Kings). I was also afraid of it being a formulaic quintessential Hollywood romantic comedy. While the ending was predictable, it was the finale you were rooting for all along. What separates this picture from others in the genre are the strong multifaceted characters, the impeccable balance of both drama and comedy, and keen sense of insight on the subject matter at hand. Silver Linings Playbook is a strong showcase in all aspects—intelligent writing, perceptive direction, and razor-sharp efforts from the talented ensemble of actors.

Bradley Copper plays Pat Solatano, a substitute teacher getting released from state institute for beating up the man his wife was cheating on him with. Determined to turn his life around, Pat will do whatever it takes to win back his wife despite the circumstances that stand in his way. However, he isn’t allowed to speak to her because of a court-ruled restraining order due to his violent nature and temperamental mood swings. In the mean time, his mother and father want the best for their son and have him be a part of their obsession with the Philadelphia Eagles. Pat’s dad, played by Robert DeNiro (seriously his best role in years and one worthy of a supporting Oscar nomination) is a superstitious bookmaker. His superstitions play a significant role in the film, but ultimately he just wants to reconnect with his son, who’s seemingly lost and driven to get his wife back that may not even love him anymore. However, Pat meets Tiffany, a girl with

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